DAN EUBANKS

DAN-EUBANKSDAN EUBANKS
LOOK WHAT THE CITY’S DONE

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Dan Eubanks, the versatile bass player with Special Consensus, showcases his talents on a debut solo album which features his singing and songwriting, as well as his solid bass playing.

Six of twelve cuts are originals, two of those co-written with Jon Weisberger and Tony Rackley. Stylistically, the album swings from lonesome-edged contemporary bluegrass, blues and jazz-influenced material, to country songs reminiscent of the Louvin Brothers and A.P. Carter’s “Wabash Cannonball.” There are a couple of fiddle tunes: “Squirrel Hunter” with Deanie Richardson guesting on fiddle and “Cattle In The Cane” which features Isaac Eicher (one of Shelby Eicher’s talented sons) on mandolin, and Giovanni Rodriguez on congas along with bass. Dan has eclectic tastes, along with the chops to pull off tunes from multiple genres.

As one would expect, the bass is easy to hear in the mix, and solos are sprinkled in generously. The album starts out with these attention-grabbing lyrics: With a head full of liquor I come into town / I come into town, just to try to track her down. By the end of the song, the singer doesn’t remember exactly what happened the night before, but he’s a little troubled by a missing round in his gun. “Stormy Horizons,” written by Ira Louvin and Irene Franks, shows off an effective Eubanks/Rick Faris harmony blend. “October In The South,” an instrumental performed with his bandmates in Special Consensus (Faris, Greg Cahill, Nick Dumas), capture autumn in middle Tennessee perfectly. “Jordan’s Train” is a bluesy gospel original with strong creative lyrics. “I Mean You” is a Thelonius Monk/Coleman Hawkins composition performed by Dan and ace guitarist Chris Luquette. The amazing John Cowan sings tenor on three cuts, and the core instrumental band includes Ashby Frank, Ned Luberecki, and Brandon Bostic.

Bass players usually stand in the back, intent on timing and laying down the groove, doing their utmost to connect things and make every other band member sound good. Dan Eubanks’ good ears have come in handy in the areas of production, arrangement, song selection, and casting the perfect singers and musicians to make the vision for his album shine.(daneubanks.bandcamp.com)NCW

 

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